Academic Master

English

Intensive Care By Heather McHugh

McHugh’s poem Intensive Care has drama in the conflict as a perception and investigation of the content of her poem and the human condition. Her poem “Intensive Care” challenges the reader through the creation of a dialectical tension between her choice of forms and words.

For instance, her use of metaphor, wordplay, and slang transforms ordinary images into intricate and meaningful words. For instance, “The Intensive Care” flashes from high rocks in sprays of spectra, showing the glowing joy in the heart of a person. This is because it is a good metaphor for a joyous moment. The metaphor was used in the stanza.“I swear affective life is water: Variously formed and regulated, Curiously colored and abounded.”

The poem also presents challenges to a person’s sense of self-centeredness in this big world. The poem discusses the loss of love and language. The speaker is viewed as a cerebral and modernist writer, and most people like her works because of the use of sexual innuendo, unusual metaphors, word games, invented words, and surrealist imagery. However, the conflict here is that the wordplay in the poem is too clever and lacks emotional substance and depth. McHugh applies epiphany narrative organization. Her poem is marked by strangeness, such as being extraneous and having some form of Indo-European roots. The Boston Review describes her work. The intensive care ends in spirit and continues in a slather. McHugh intends to show that there is a seriousness beneath or on the surface of each piece she makes. Her work in intensive care is characterized by fast, dazzling, and white verbal dexterity.

According to James Tate, this is a “wickedly astute critic of our times.” She cast a sharp eye on human motivations. For example, McHugh marries emotional and intellectual depth and surface brilliance for the poem to be great. The writer used epiphany narrative as a way of arguing about a particular point. McHugh’s intensive care shows that there is an improvement from a critical to a serious condition. However, she uses the poem to mean that the situation changes from a comic to a grave. Therefore, readers must understand the works as serious on one side and in a different situation, meaning merely serious conditions. Additionally, one situation can be darker; hence, there must be light at the end of the tunnel. In her poem “The Intensive Care,” McHugh explores her love and friendship and begins with stanza one describing how they were bad. “Today we were bad together; tonight (10-11), We’ll be good and alone”.

Therefore, the readers have to understand that her condition is ironic and perilous. There are two issues that attract the attention of every reader of this passage. It clearly brings out a rule against conflicting the speaker and the poet. The author uses the lines” But that’s the easiest way to say. In every school of poetry, students, it can be evidenced that McHugh’s liked philosophy, just like Dickinson framed her passion, is confessedly compulsive. The poem is among the intensive care is among the short poems that were done by the author. McHugh has struggled with language, and it seems the language cannot give her up. Consequently, she has, on many occasions, found herself in a bind that can be ruined by her own desideratum.

The Boston Review describes McHugh’s thoughts from the Paris Review Book: the intensive care ends with a shot and continues in a slather. McHugh intends to show that there is a seriousness beneath or on the surface of each piece she makes. Her work in intensive care is characterized by fast, dazzling, and wittedness verbal dexterity. According to The Paris Review Book, the poem is a “wickedly astute critic of our times.” She casts a sharp eye on human motivations. For example, McHugh marries emotional and intellectual depth and surface brilliance for the poem to be great. The writer used epiphany narrative as a way of arguing about a particular point.

On some occasions, both readers can understand that McHugh has given them an upgraded collection of logographic pieces. McHugh’s intensive care shows that there is a variation of what the poet wanted to discuss and what she said in the last sections. Despite writing things about the situation at the critical moment, it does not indicate that there was a serious implication. For instance, the Improvement forms a critical to serious condition. However, she uses the poem to mean that the situation changes from a comic to a grave. Therefore, readers must understand the works as serious on one side and in a different situation, meaning merely serious conditions. Additionally, one situation can be darker; hence, there must be light at the end of the tunnel.

In her poem “Intensive Care,” McHugh explores her love and friendship and begins with stanza one describing how they were bad. Her use of different styles, such as metaphor, wordplay, and slang, transforms ordinary images into intricate and meaningful words. For example, “the poem has a stanza that reads, “flashes from high rocks, in sprays of spectra showing the glowing joy in the heart of a person. This is because it is a good metaphor for a joyous moment.

Works Cited

Carey, Kevin. “Set in Stone. The Academy of American Poets.” 13th March 2018.

Ladin, Jay. “Heather McHugh and the Schooling of American Poetry.” Parnassus: Poetry

in Review. 29.1 (1995): 120-137.McHugh, Heather. “Intensive Care.” The Paris Review Book of Heartbreak, Madness, Sex,

Love, Betrayal, Outsiders, Intoxication, War, Whimsy, Horrors, God, Death, Dinner,

Baseball, Travels, the Art of Writing, and Everything Else in the World Since 1953,

Edited by The Editors of The Paris Review, Picador, 2004 pp.35/36.

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