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Does Media Give Us Reality?

What Is A Media Text? List Some Examples.

Media text is an object, material or event that conveys meaning to its audience. For example, media text can be informed by text, graphics, visuals, or electronic means. There are several examples of media text, such as print media, which includes books, magazines, and newspapers. In addition to print media, there are television, cell phones, software, and the internet.

Does Media Give Us Reality?

A larger part of the media has been under attack for false representation of reality. Social media has been the major victim of the condensation. National television, on the other hand, is more trusted to depict the current state of various societies. In as much as television is trusted, it is, however, characterized by elements of exaggeration [1]. Despite the exaggeration, the media does depict reality. For example, television programs might give an exaggerated report on the poor state of education in a given society, but with the same information, it highlights and creates awareness of the current state of education in society. Similarly, social media is known to present fake information about individuals who make their lives appear more interesting than what it is. By the mere representation of fake information, one can easily note that there is an increased rate of discontent and fake lifestyles in society.

Readership Strategies

A large number of authors are struggling to generate traffic to their blogs despite how often they update their content. One of the strategies that authors can implement is connecting with their offline relations [2]. For example, if one starts a blog on social issues affecting society, the first audience should be family, friends, and colleagues. The inner circle can then help in expanding one’s readership by inviting one’s inner circle to visit the blog.

In addition to one’s inner circle, one can use their email address to share a link to their new post. The current generation has been found to have a higher rate of the use of emails as a means of communication compared to earlier generations [3]. One can, therefore, take advantage of emails and attach links to the new post to every mail sent. For example, if an author sends an average of 100 emails a day, it means 100 people will have been updated on the new post. Not all will click on the link, but few will click on the link. In the end, more people are reached, and traffic is generated.

Besides, one can use facts, a method that has been proven to make content more authentic. Content with facts attracts more people, and a large number of the audience is looking for facts and not content based on one’s emotions. For instance, if one is talking about the increasing rate of bad governance in the state, one should provide a statistic that depicts the decline in the rate of development.

What Is Semiotics, Signifier And Signified?

Semiotics is the study of signs and what they stand for in society. Signifier refers to the code or item being read, on the other hand, the signified is the meaning being expressed by the signifier [4]. .

What Is Ideology?

Ideology refers to the worldview of an individual or society. It includes the values they hold dear, beliefs, and practices that are believed to be true and authentic [5]. For instance, an individual subscribing to the Christian faith may consider Gay marriages unacceptable and back up their belief according to their faith. At the same time, another person may use scientific proof to assert that the practice is acceptable.

What Is A Genre?

Genre in media refers to the type of media that exists. Examples of three genres of media include Film, Print media, which consists of books and magazines, and electronic media, which involves the internet and television.

How Do Stereotypes Work?

The media has become a means by which stereotypes and ideas have been established in society from one generation to the other. For instance, the stereotype that men are better than women has been carried forward across generations through films. Most Superhero films portray male characters as the main heroes who save society. The continued exposure to such films leads to the emergence of a generation where females will expect a male figure to solve their problems while females cannot do anything in their vulnerable situation [6]. Moreover, print media has also contributed to spreading stereotypes. For instance, the existence of numerous research books and articles about the pathetic conditions of African states has led to the stereotypical idea that Africa is all about war, an outbreak of diseases and corruption. Although the issues are real, they overshadow strengths such as various innovations in the continent and rising talents. Similarly, Electronic media is a major contributor to the illusion that a particular way of living is the fashionable way [7]. For instance, most advertisements on television and even posts on the internet portray clubbing and drinking as the most fun way of living, such that if an individual does not participate in them, they are considered an outcast.

Bibliography

Bishop, Jonathan. “Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: a review of media- texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling.'” International Journal of Web Based Communities 10, no. 1 (2014): 7-24.

Fedorov, Alexander, and Anastasia Levitskaya. “The framework of media education and media criticism in the contemporary world: the opinion of international experts.” (2015).

Gravells, Jane. “Semiotics and Verbal Texts-How the News Media Construct a Crisis.” (2017).

Hoffmann, Anke, and Yvonne Volkart. “Connect. Art between Media and Reality.” (2015).

Kraker, Peter, Christian Schlögl, Kris Jack, and Stefanie Lindstaedt. “Visualization of co-readership patterns from an online reference management system.” Journal of Informetrics9, no. 1 (2015): 169-182.

Zheltukhina, Marina Rostislavovna. “Institutional, Stereotypical and Mythological Media Markers of Modern Society.” Biosciences Biotechnology Research Asia 12, no. 1 (2015): 913-920.

Hoffmann, Anke, and Yvonne Volkart. “Connect. Art between Media and Reality.” (2015).

Kraker, Peter, Christian Schlögl, Kris Jack, and Stefanie Lindstaedt. “Visualization of co-readership patterns from an online reference management system.” Journal of Informetrics9, no. 1 (2015): 169-182.

Kraker, Peter, Christian Schlögl, Kris Jack, and Stefanie Lindstaedt. “Visualization of co-readership patterns from an online reference management system.” Journal of Informetrics9, no. 1 (2015): 169-182.

Gravells, Jane. “Semiotics and Verbal Texts-How the News Media Construct a Crisis.” (2017).

Fedorov, Alexander, and Anastasia Levitskaya. “The framework of media education and media criticism in the contemporary world: the opinion of international experts.” (2015).

Zheltukhina, Marina Rostislavovna. “Institutional, Stereotypical and Mythological Media Markers of Modern Society.” Biosciences Biotechnology Research Asia 12, no. 1 (2015): 913-920

Bishop, Jonathan. “Representations of ‘trolls’ in mass media communication: a review of media-texts and moral panics relating to ‘internet trolling.'” International Journal of Web Based Communities 10, no. 1 (2014): 7-24.

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