Academic Master

English

This Is Spinal Tap Movie Analysis

This film represents the growth and development of rock and roll and the challenges faced by most rock artists of the 1970s. The majority of the songs in the movie follow the 1980s hard rock and roll with comedy thrown in to make it a great musical comedy film[1].

The group faces several challenges, from mismanagement and poor reception by the audience to the point where Faith, the manager, and Tufnell momentarily leave the group. This represents what occurred to rock musicians of the 1970s. They are later united and later plan a trip to Japan, where the group is popular, and the film ends with Spinal Tap playing some of their most sold-out arena shows in Japan[2]. This indicates that the popularity of the music depends on the market. Three actors, McKean, Shearer, and Guest use mock English accents throughout the movie[3] and represent young, free-thinking, uneducated, creative rock artists of the 1970s

Rock will be remembered not for its social statement since it was stared in the 1970s by unemployed youths who refused to integrate any rules of music to their art, but by its excesses in the new genres of rock composition[4]. Although rock and roll was initially intended for African Americans, young white consumers adopted and played it in their jukeboxes, and its popularity grew. It thrived on the expanded market in radio and television. Socially, rock and roll became an acceptable form of musical entertainment for the young generation of the 1970s and was well-accepted in black-and-white social circles.

Bibliography

Carlson, Tylor, Zrockr Magazine, This is Spinal Tap- a Look Back at the Classic 1984 Film (2015), retrieved from, https://zrockr.com/2015/12/18/this-is-spinal-tap/, (accessed April 4, 2018).

Crow, Jonathan, Open Culture, The Origins of Spinal Tap: Watch the 20-Minute Short Film Created to Pitch the Classic Mockumentary (2015), retrieved from, http://www.openculture.com/2015/01/the-origins-of-spinal-tap.html (accessed on April 4, 2018)

Menand, Louis, The New Yorker: The Elvic Oracle, Did anyone Invent Rock and Roll,(2015) November 16 Issue retrieved from, https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/11/16/the-elvic-oracle (accessed on April 4, 2018)

Carlson Tylor, Zrockr Magazine, This is Spinal Tap- a Look Back at the Classic 1984 Film (2015), retrieved from, https://zrockr.com/2015/12/18/this-is-spinal-tap/,(accessed April 4 2018).

Ibid 1

Crow, Jonathan, Open Culture, The Origins of Spinal Tap: Watch the 20-Minute Short Film Created to Pitch the Classic Mockumentary (2015), retrieved from, http://www.openculture.com/2015/01/the-origins-of-spinal-tap.html (accessed on April 4, 2018)

Menand, Louis, The New Yorker: The Elvic Oracle, Did anyone Invent Rock and Roll,(2015) November 16 Issue retrieved from, https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2015/11/16/the-elvic-oracle (accessed on April 4, 2018) ↑

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